Commit 1bb20c2b authored by Thomas Schmitt's avatar Thomas Schmitt

Took into respect that xorriso loads non-RR images

parent 91ad5bdb
......@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
.\" First parameter, NAME, should be all caps
.\" Second parameter, SECTION, should be 1-8, maybe w/ subsection
.\" other parameters are allowed: see man(7), man(1)
.TH XORRISO 1 "Nov 11, 2008"
.TH XORRISO 1 "Nov 13, 2008"
.\" Please adjust this date whenever revising the manpage.
.\"
.\" Some roff macros, for reference:
......@@ -197,17 +197,16 @@ probably show any media as closed CD-ROM resp. DVD-ROM.
Overwriteable media assume this state in such read-only drives or if they
contain unrecognizable data in the first 32 data blocks.
.br
\fBRead-only\fR drives may or may not show session histories of multi-session
Read-only drives may or may not show session histories of multi-session
media. Often only the first and the last session are visible. Sometimes
not even that. Option -rom_toc_scan might or might not help in such cases.
.SS
.B Creating, Growing, Modifying, Blind Growing:
.br
A new empty ISO image gets \fBcreated\fR
if there is no input drive with a valid
ISO 9660 image plus Rock Ridge extensions when the first time an output drive
is defined. This is achieved by option -dev on blank media or by option -outdev
on media in any state.
if there is no input drive with a valid ISO 9660 image when the first time
an output drive is defined. This is achieved by option -dev on blank media
or by option -outdev on media in any state.
.br
The new empty image can be populated with directories and files.
Before it can be written, the media in the output drive must get into
......@@ -260,8 +259,7 @@ Input drive, i.e. source of an existing or empty ISO image, can be any random
access readable libburn drive: optical media with readable data,
blank optical media, regular files, block devices.
.br
Rock Ridge info must be present in existing ISO images and it will be generated
by the program unconditionally.
Rock Ridge info will be generated by the program unconditionally.
.PP
Output drive, i.e. target for writing, can be any libburn drive.
Some drive types do not support the method of growing but only the methods
......@@ -337,7 +335,7 @@ with ownership, access permissions, symbolic links, and other attributes.
.PP
This is what xorriso uses for a decent representation of the disk files
within the ISO image. Rock Ridge information is produced with any xorriso
image and xorriso will load for manipulation only Rock Ridge enhanced images.
image.
.PP
xorriso is not named "porriso" because POSIX only guarantees 14 characters
of filename length. It is the X/Open System Interface standard XSI which
......@@ -1516,28 +1514,23 @@ on differently nationalized computers.
The meanings of byte codes are defined in \fBcharacter sets\fR which have
names. Shell command iconv -l lists them.
.br
Character sets should not matter as long as only alphanumeric characters are
used for file names or as long as the shell session which runs xorriso uses the
same character set as the one which wrote the loaded image and the same
character set as the computers which shall read the newly emerging ISO image.
Character sets should not matter as long as only english alphanumeric
characters are used for file names or as long as all writers and readers
of the media use the same character set.
Outside these constraints it may be necessary to let xorriso convert byte
codes.
.br
There is an input conversion from input character set to the local character
set which applies when an ISO image gets loaded. A conversion from local
character set to the output character set is performed when a new
character set to the output character set is performed when an
image tree gets written. The sets can be defined independently by options
-in_charset and -out_charset. Normally one will have both identical, if ever.
.br
If conversions are desired then it is necessary to know the name of the
If conversions are desired then xorriso needs to know the name of the
local character set. xorriso can inquire the same info as shell command
"locale" with argument "charmap". This may or may not be the correct name.
So one should check.
.br
A typical wrong answer would be "ANSI_X3.4-1968" if your shell session supports
non-US-ASCII characters.
It is outside the scope of xorriso how to find out the correct name in such
a case. The author of this text uses -local_charset "ISO-8859-1".
"locale" with argument "charmap". This may be influenced by environment
variables LC_ALL, LC_CTYPE, or LANG and should match the expectations of
the terminal.
.TP
\fB\-charset\fR character_set_name
Set the character set from which to convert file names when loading an
......@@ -1545,6 +1538,8 @@ image and to which to convert when writing an image.
.TP
\fB\-local_charset\fR character_set_name
Override the system assumption of the local character set name.
If this appears necessary, one should consider to set -backslash_codes to
"on" in order to avoid dangerous binary codes being sent to the terminal.
.TP
.B Exception processing:
.PP
......@@ -2597,9 +2592,9 @@ Now xorriso can burn an El Torito bootable media:
This example assumes that the existing ISO image was written with character
set ISO-8859-1 but that the readers expected UTF-8. Now a new session with
the same files gets added with converted file names.
In order to avoid any weaknesses of the local character set this command
In order to avoid any weaknesses of the local character set, this command
pretends that it uses already the final target set UTF-8.
Therefore strange file names may appear in eventual error messages which
Therefore strange file names may appear in eventual messages which
will be made terminal-safe by option -backslash_codes.
.br
\fB$\fR xorriso -in_charset ISO-8859-1 -local_charset UTF-8 \\
......
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